Shore excursions in Italy ,Daily Tours and guided Limousine services.
We had an awesome day with Claudio our driver. He collected us promptly and took care to find out what we expected to get from our trip and made sure that he exceeded these expectations. He called ahead to book a trusted private tour guide who was waiting for us on our arrival in Pompeii - he was fantastic! And then we drove on to Sorrento, stopping at various places on the Amalfie Coast to take photographs and then we had a late lunch in Il Positano, before returning to Rome. Travelling with two young daughters, it was a long day trip, but memorable - and we all thought it was our best day of our week-long holiday to Rome.
Tour Of Rome
Date published: 02/20/2016
5 / 5 stars
Driverinrome Tours and Transportation
Via Pian del marmo 21 Rome, Italy 00166
Phone: +1 315 544-0496
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RMW-04 JEWISH QUARTERS

The Jewish Community of Rome is the most ancient in Europe. The first Jews arrived here in the year 161 A.C. They came as ambassadors of Judah Maccabi seeking Roman protection against the Hellenistic, Syrian emperor Antiochus IV. Subsequently, may Jews decided to move to Rome because it was a major Mediterranean trading center. The Jews brought with them rituals and traditions that were in use in the Temple in Jerusalem, which today are commonly referred to as the "Italian tradition". They originally lived in Trastevere where all foreigners were required to reside. At the time Jews were not citizens of Rome because Israel and Judea were not yet part of the Roman Empire. Later after both Israel and Judea became client states of Rome there was a Jewish uprising, which was repressed in 70 A.D. by the Roman general Titus who destroyed and sacked Jerusalem and the Temple with the loss of many thousands of Jewish lives. Many of the Jews who survived escaped in two different directions (Diaspora -Dispersion): one group went to the Medirerranean area and are known as Sephardic (spanish) Jews; while another group, known as Ashkenazi (German) Jews, migrated to northern Europe. Titus brought a third group of Jews to Rome seized in the uprising and who became slaves. Subsequently, they joined the Jewish community living in Rome. Durign the Middle Ages many Jews moved form Trastevere to the area around Ponte Fabricio. However, as a result of the attitude of the Papacy there was discrimination and the Jews were separated and isolated from the rest of the population. In 1215 the Curch forced the Jews to wear distinctive insignia on their clothing identifying them as Jews. In 1492 the Catholic monarchs of Spain, Ferdinand and Isabella, expelled the Jews from Spain and the Kingdom of the Two Sicilys (Sicily, Calabria and Sardinia). While the Borgia Pope Alexander VI allowed these Jews to remain in the Papal States, in 1555 his successor, Paul IV, estabilished the Ghetto in Rome and required all Jews to live there. The Ghetto area was very small, surrounded by a wall with five gates and living conditions were very unhealthy with constant flooding in winter. The Jews were allowed to leave the Ghetto during the daytime but were required to wear Jewish insignia. Only two professions were permitted: money lending and selling used clothing. In the Ghetto there were five synagogues: Scola Catalana, Scola Castigliana, Scola Siciliana, Scola Tempio and Scola Nova. Some of the objects that were used in these synagogues are exhibited in this Museum. The Jews werw emancipated and obtained full citizenship after 1870 when Italy was unified. The Ghetto was abolished and the Jews remained full citizens until 1938 when the anti- Semitic and discrimitatory Italian Racial Laws were adopted. Durign the German occupation (September 1943 until June 1944) 2091 Jews were deported to extermination camps, mainly Auschwitz. Only 16 survived the camps. In 1944 in the caves outside of Roma (Fosse Ardeatine) the Germans massacred 335 Italians, includign 75 Jews. Rome was declared an "Open City" during World War II due to presence of Pope Pius XII. As a result, the Nazis did not destroy any monuments in Rome including the Synagogue, which was sealed and reopened after the war. In 1982 immediately following the festival of Simchat Torah the synagogue was attacked by terrorists and a two - year - old boy was killed with many injured. Since that time security has been provided by the Italian police. Today, approximately 16.000 Jews live in Rome and there are several Italina, Sefardic and Ashkenazi synagogues in the City.

RMW-04 JEWISH QUARTERS
Duration: 4 Hours
Location: Rome (Italy)

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RATES
1-3 240.00 €
4-6 260.00 €
7-8 280.00 € Group rates
Cancellation policy


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PAYMENTS ACCEPTED

We accept US Dollars, Euros, Paypal and Credit Cards (Mastercard and Visa only) .

Whenever possible, payment in Euros is greatly appreciated and will avoid costly Italian bank commission on exchange rates. However if you choose a different payment method rather than Euro cash, the additional costs are as follow: Credit card + 12 %
Pay Pal + 10 %
Cash USD - Official exchange rate + 7%
  • Description
  • Notes

The Jewish Community of Rome is known to be the oldest Jewish community in Europe and also one the oldest continuous Jewish settlements in the world. The first Jews arrived here in the year 161 A.C. They came as ambassadors of Judah Maccabi seeking Roman protection against the Greek king Antiochus IV. Subsequently, many Jews decided to move to Rome because it was a major Mediterranean trading center.

They originally lived in Trastevere where all foreigners were required to reside. At the time, Jews were not citizens of Rome because Israel and Judea were not yet part of the Roman Empire. Later when they became client states of Rome there was a Jewish uprising, which was repressed in 70 A.D. by the Roman general Titus who destroyed and sacked Jerusalem and the Temple with the loss of many thousands of Jewish lives. Many of the Jews who survived escaped in two different directions (Diaspora -Dispersion): one group went to the Medirerranean area and are known as Sephardic (spanish) Jews; while another group, known as Ashkenazi (German) Jews, migrated to northern Europe. Titus brought a third group of Jews to Rome seized in the uprising and who became slaves. Subsequently, they joined the Jewish community living in Rome. During the Middle Ages many Jews moved form Trastevere to the area around Ponte Fabricio.

During the Reformation, in 1555, Pope Paul IV decreed that all Jews must be segregated into their own quarter. The Ghetto area was very small, surrounded by a wall with five gates and living conditions were very unhealthy with constant flooding in winter. The Jews were allowed to leave the Ghetto during the daytime but were required to wear a Jewish insignia. More oppressive measures, which contained a variety of prohibitions designed to condemn Jews to abject misery, depriving them of the means of sustenance, and denying them the exercise of all professions were later enforced.

In 1870, Italy was united as a nation under King Victor Emanuel, who decreed that the ghettos be dismantled and gave the Jews full citizenship. Following the end of the papal states, Jews fully integrated into Italian society. During the German occupation (September 1943 until June 1944), despite resistance from the Italian public and officials, 2091 Jews were deported to extermination camps, mainly Auschwitz. Only 16 survived the camps. In 1944 in the caves outside of Roma (Fosse Ardeatine) the Germans massacred 335 Italians, including 75 Jews.

Rome was declared an "Open City" during World War II due to the presence of Pope Pius XII. As a result, the Nazis did not destroy any monuments in the city including the Synagogue, which was sealed and reopened after the war. In 1982, immediately following the festival of Simchat Torah, the synagogue was attacked by terrorists and a 2- year old boy was killed with many injured. Since then security has been provided by the Italian police.

The continual presence of a Jewish community in Rome for more than two millennia has produced a distinctive tradition of prayer comparable to the Sephardic or Ashkenazi traditions called the Nusach Italki (Italian rite). The nusach has its own order of prayer and tunes and a number of synagogues in Rome, including the Great Synagogue, follow this tradition.

This tour will also take you to Campo de' Fiori. Its name translated as "field of flowers", the square was once a meadow and today, is best known for its daily lively market. The statue of the Italian philosopher Giordano Bruno, who in the year 1600 was burned at the stake by the Roman Inquisition, reminds us of the square's gruesome history as a site of public executions.

Kindly take note tickets are not included in the rate.

Highlights:

- The Jewish Museum and the Synagogue
- Porticus Octaviae
- Campo de' Fiori

Notice:

Complete information including our phone numbers, meeting time and place are included in your confirmation voucher.
Please give your voucher to the driver at the end of the tour. We hand select our drivers and tour guides in order to give you the ultimate experience. We would love to hear from you after your tour is completed.
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Important information

- Please dress respectfully for visiting religious monuments; local custom requires covering knees and shoulder.

- Comfortable walking shoes recommended.

- The tour sequence may be altered to avoid congestions but always covering mentioned sights.

- Keep an eye on your wallet and purses at all time. Do not wear jewelry or carry large amount of cash.

Inclusions

- Professional licensed tour guide

Exclusions

- Lunch
- Admission fees to the Museum are not included and must be paid on location

- Tips to guide ( please read below for more information)

Gratuities

Tips are never included in our quotes.
I think that a tip shouldn't be included in the rate otherwise it would be a tax.
Tip only if you really liked the service.
Tips are a personal gesture and are given whenever the client feels it is necessary.
Tips are generally: 10% not bad - 15 % great - 20 % best tour in my life. Please report any abuse.